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JOB OPENINGS

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT MANAGER

 

Job Summary:

The Community Engagement Manager (CEM) is a key member of BFFP’s Global Coordination team, working closely with the Global Coordinator and the movement’s designated regional nodes in developing and co-creating strategies for movement building and engagement with our members and partners, otherwise referred to as the BFFP Community. Reporting to the Global Coordinator, s/he will lead the implementation of our agreed engagement strategy, improving internal communications  and networking within the BFFP Community, catalyzing peer to peer or direct member to member coordination, and activating associate members and individual supporters to become more active players in advancing the goals of the movement.

Main Responsibilities:

The Community Engagement Manager, will be responsible for

  • Coordinating and having regular conversations with BFFP’s regional nodes and contacts, using such opportunities to link members and partners to support global pushes and various local campaigns and in the process help build a strong, well connected network within the movement; (This will be done in conjunction with the Global Coordinator).
  • Leading the development and implementation of our Movement Engagement strategy, plans and programs –  which includes maintaining strong interactions with core members and activating associate members and individual supporters to become more active players in advancing the goals of the movement;
  • Catalyzing and facilitating cross-regional communications between member organizations around the world, with the end in view of encouraging more direct peer to peer or member to member collaboration and communications;
  • Collaborating with the regional nodes in identifying and developing new tools and platforms that would boost engagement within the movement (including maps, databases, shared calendars, etc.);
  • Helping track and oversee the growth and health of the global movement based on agreed indicators;
  • Coordinating projects that would strengthen the movement and advance its goals in the process;
  • Helping identify key decisions, collaborations, and other opportunities for membership growth, development and engagement;
  • Helping organize and facilitate global and regional in-person meetings and/or events of the movement, in coordination with local host organizations and partners;
  • Identifying stories of successful organizing and campaigning against plastics and ensuring these are shared and amplified within the movement, in collaboration with the Communications Hub;
  • Helping build the capacity of BFFP members to do effective on-the-ground organizing and campaigning via webinars, skill shares and direct peer to peer exchanges;
  • Assisting with administration and budgeting of Movement building projects and initiatives;
  • Proactively contributing to the development of fundraising proposals relevant to our objective of further strengthening and growing the movement;
  • Helping provide coordination support for regions that are not current priorities for BFFP.

Essential Qualifications:

  • Minimum bachelor’s degree in communications, social sciences or a related field, with at least 2-3  years working experience in a communications, supporter service, or networking role.
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills in English.
  • Experience working with people from different cultures and nationalities in a way that facilitates conflict prevention and values community wisdom.
  • Strong computer literacy skills and familiarity with web-based tools and platforms for coordination and planning purposes.
  • Team player with good interpersonal skills, and able to use initiative to take decisions when required.
  • Willing to travel.
  • Creative and flexible, able to multi-task and deliver to tight deadlines.

Desirable and Preferred Skills:

  • Experience with campaigning on social and/or environmental justice issues at the international or local level.
  • Knowledge of and interest in environmental campaigns, particularly in the fields of waste and plastic pollution.
  • Experience working in civil society coalitions, NGOs, or non-profit sector organizations.
  • Fluency in other languages (e.g. Spanish, French, Chinese, Arabic, etc).
  • Relevant training or experience in meeting Facilitation and/or events organizing.

Location, Compensation and Work Environment:

This is a full-time position based in Manila. The Community Engagement Manager will report to the Global Coordinator.

We offer a competitive salary plus benefits, including vacation, maternity/paternity leave, and health insurance. Salary will be negotiated according to local standards and experience.

We are committed in supporting one another’s work in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect, and look forward to welcome the successful candidate to the team and our network of members.

Please send your Curriculum Vitae to von@breakfreefromplastic.org with the subject line ” Application: CEM” on or before 30 November 2018. 

About #breakfreefromplastic

#breakfreefromplastic is a global movement envisioning a future free from plastic pollution. Since its launch in September 2016, nearly 1,400 organizations from across the world have joined the movement to demand massive reductions in single-use plastics and to push for lasting solutions to the plastic pollution crisis. The vision of  #breakfreefromplastic is a world where the land, sky, oceans, and water is home to an abundance of life, not an abundance of plastic, and where the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat is free of toxic by-products of plastic pollution. In this world the principles of environmental justice, social justice, public health, and human rights lead government policy, not the demands of elites and corporations. This is a future we believe in and are creating together.

To know more please visit: https://www.breakfreefromplastic.org/.

 

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#breakfreefromplastic Is Supercharging Coastal Cleanups With Brand Audits To Name Corporate Polluters

#breakfreefromplastic Is Supercharging Coastal Cleanups With Brand Audits To Name Corporate Polluters

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Brand audits highlight citizen action to hold polluters accountable, getting to the root cause of the plastic pollution crisis

Break Free From Plastic, the global movement working to stop plastic pollution, is taking coastal cleanups a step further – by naming the brands most responsible for the plastic pollution found on our beaches and beyond.

Throughout a global week of action, September 9-15, 2018, groups under the #breakfreefromplastic banner have collectively organized more than 180 cleanups in 49 countries to incorporate data on corporate plastic pollution found in communities across the world. These particular events will conclude on World Cleanup Day, September 15, and a report will follow citing brand responsibility for the plastic pollution found in nearly 150 cities around the globe. #breakfreefromplastic is looking forward to hosting more brand audits until coastal cleanup becomes of a thing of the past.

Corporations cannot greenwash their role out of the plastic pollution crisis and put the blame on people, all the time. Our brand audits make it clear which companies are primarily responsible for the proliferation of throwaway plastic that’s defiling nature and killing our oceans. Their brands provide undeniable evidence of this truth,” stated Von Hernandez, #breakfreefromplastic Global Coordinator.

From San Francisco, California to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, organizers are working in solidarity under the global #breakfreefromplastic banner. Nipe Fagio, a Break Free organization in Dar es Salaam, is no stranger to brand audits. In fact, the group is organizing cleanups at more than 30 sites across the city during World Cleanup Day to shape the future for a cleaner Tanzania. “Over 50% of waste collected during our beach cleanups in the last 6 months comprise of plastic that range from packaging materials and beverage bottles manufactured by MeTL group, to toothbrushes, straws and pens,” shares Navonaeli Omari-Kaniki, Program Coordinator at Nipe Fagio.

Brand audits are about creating corporate accountability for the plastic pollution that litters our oceans, waterways, and communities,” said Graham Forbes, Global Plastics Project Leader at Greenpeace. “For far too long, companies have put the onus on the individual to just recycle more, but we know that only 9 percent of plastics ever made have actually been recycled. It’s essential that these corporations take concrete steps to innovate away from single-use plastic. People all over the world will continue to hold them accountable until they do,” he added.

By categorizing and counting branded plastic packaging during cleanup efforts, #breakfreefromplastic is identifying the corporation’s most responsible for plastic pollution.

Corporations like Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Nestle, Unilever, Starbucks, Procter & Gamble, and McDonald’s have a major role to play when it comes to plastic pollution. We are sold coffee, soda, chips, candy, sandwiches, shampoo, soap, and even fruits and vegetables packaged in throwaway plastic. It’s time for these corporations to take responsibility for single-use plastic,” said Stiv Wilson, Campaigns Director at The Story of Stuff Project.

As First Nations Peoples, we continue to resist corporate colonialism which profits from extractive economies and disposable plastic culture while pushing the burden of responsibility to community recycling and individual consumer choice,” stated Mati Waiya, Executive Director at the Wishtoyo Chumash Foundation. “We maintain our traditional responsibilities to protect our homelands and waters – that includes holding corporations accountable for their role in generating this excessive waste,” Mati Waiya added.

#breakfreeformplastic is mobilizing massive citizen muscle with a common mission so corporations can no longer frame the issue as one of only consumer responsibility. The movement boasts nearly 1,300 groups working towards a similar goal of holding companies accountable for the plastic waste they produce.

It’s unfair for North American and European companies who earn billions of dollars annually to pass the burden of managing the waste of their products to communities and cities in the global south. These companies know full well that these countries lack the resources and capacity to handle this type of plastic waste in their systems,” stated Anne Larracas, Asia Pacific Managing Director at the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives.

Member organizations of the #breakfreefromplastic movement involved in the global brand audit efforts include: Greenpeace International, Surfrider Foundation, 5 Gyres, EcoWaste Coalition, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, Health Care Without Harm, Mother Earth Foundation, Nipe Fagio, The Story of Stuff Project, Zero Waste Montenegro, Amicas De La Terra Mallorca, CEJAD, PlastiCo Project, NESMAC-KITARA, Student PIRGs, Inland Ocean Coalition, Planeteers of Southern Maine, Instituto Argonauta Para Conservação Costeira e Marinha, People and the Sea, Rockefeller University, Científicos de la Basura, Wishtoyo Chumash Foundation, and Let’s Do It World.

# # # # #

To view the brand audit toolkit, click here.

To learn why brand audits are better than clean-ups, click here.

About #breakfreefromplastic:

#breakfreefromplastic is a global movement envisioning a future free from plastic pollution. Since its launch in September 2016, nearly 1,300 groups from across the world have joined the movement to demand massive reductions in single-use plastics and to push for lasting solutions to the plastic pollution crisis. These organizations share the common values of environmental protection and social justice, which guide their work at the community level and represent a global, unified vision.  www.breakfreefromplastic.org.

 

Press Contacts:

Shilpi Chhotray, #breakfreefromplastic (shilpi@breakfreefromplastic.org)

Claire Arkin, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (claire@no-burn.org)

Perry Wheeler, Greenpeace (perry.wheeler@greenpeace.org)

 

Highlights from past brand audits:

  • Sept 2017: Freedom Island, Philippines → Of the total waste collected during an 8-day cleanup and brand audit, half of it was plastic. 6 international brands including Nestle, Unilever, and Procter & Gamble are responsible for nearly 54% of plastic waste found during the Freedom Island brand audit.
  • March-September 2017: Bandung City, Cimahi City, and Bandung Regency, Indonesia → A total of 8,101 plastic waste items were collected from an 8-day waste assessment and characterization study. Top plastic polluters include: PT Indofood CBP Sukses Makmur Tbk, PT Santos Jaya Abadi, PT Unilever Indonesia Tbk, PT Mayora Indah Tbk, Wings Corporation, PT Djarum, Group Danone, PT Hanjaya Mandala Sampoerna Tbk., Orang Tua (OT), PT Garudafood Putra Putri Jaya.
  • May 16-26, 2018: 18 states in India → Of the total waste collected, 46,100 pieces of plastic waste were branded, of which 47.5% were multilayer plastic packaging which can neither be recycled nor composted. Pepsi Co was found to be the top multinational brand responsible for the plastic waste crisis in the territories audited, followed by Unilever and Coca Cola. Results were published in time for World Environment Day, June 5.
  • June 1, 2018: 5 cities in the Philippines → Over the course of a 12-month period found that single-use plastic packaging from multinational companies such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, PT Mayora, Colgate-Palmolive, and Coca-Cola comprised almost three-fourths of all collected residual waste.
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20
Starbucks CEO Invited To See Where Strawless Lid Will Actually End Up

Starbucks CEO Invited To See Where Strawless Lid Will Actually End Up

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Recyclers and Zero-Waste Advocates Debunk Starbucks’ Claims that New Lid Will Be “Recycled”

The #breakfreefromplastic global movement invites Starbucks CEO Kevin Thompson to see where Starbucks trash ends up: much of it across South East Asia.

In an effort to quell growing concerns about Starbucks wasteful packaging, the company just announced to much fanfare that it would phase out plastic straws and replace them with “recyclable” plastic lids. In fact, the same type of plastic Starbucks claims is “recyclable” is being sent to landfills across the nation, or shipped to countries like Malaysia or Vietnam– where it becomes pollution. “Starbucks’ claims about the ability of #5 plastics to be ‘widely recycled’ are bankrupt,” says Stiv Wilson, Director of Campaigns at the Story of Stuff Project. “This incredible attention to a single product isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it isn’t quite a good thing either if it doesn’t lead to broader, systemic change in how the world makes, uses, and disposes of the most ubiquitous material in commerce today—plastic,” he added.

As companies like Starbucks are increasingly under fire for their contribution to the plastic pollution crisis, they have primarily relied on recycling as the solution to their wasteful packaging, despite its many flaws. As a result, the US has been sending even larger quantities of “recyclable” plastic to China, causing the tremendous environmental damage that led the country to close its doors. Now the US has started sending its plastic waste to other countries in Asia, sparking these countries to enact similar bans and restrictions.

“Recycling alone is not going to solve the plastic pollution crisis,” said Greenpeace Plastics Campaigner Kate Melges. “In fact, relying on a recycling system that is failing in the U.S. and facing bans overseas will make the problem worse. To date, only 9% of all plastic ever made has been recycled. It is time for companies to move beyond flashy PR moves and start significantly reducing their production of plastic and investing in reuse alternatives.”

In many of the countries Starbuck has stores, there is little to no recycling infrastructure. Not only do Starbucks’ branded straws, hot cups, cold cups, and lids show up in beach cleanups, according to the global trash app, Litterati, Starbucks branded products are easily in the top three of brands identified globally if not number one.

With that in mind, the #breakfreefromplastic movement invites Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson to visit the communities in Southeast Asia most impacted by the plastic waste created by companies headquartered in the global north.

“The type of plastic pollution we’re seeing in Southeast Asia are produced by global corporations headquartered in North America and Europe,” said Break Free From Plastic’s Global Coordinator Von Hernandez. “While these are the countries that are being blamed for plastic pollution, the ones that are really pushing production are companies located in the global north. They need to bear the responsibility for this waste.”

The deceptiveness of industry’s recycling pledges has hampered progress towards real solutions to the plastic crisis. Monica Wilson, Research and Policy Director at GAIA, states, “We call on Starbucks to be responsible for its own products and packaging and to stop pretending the plastic flooding the market is actually getting recycled.”

For press inquiries, please contact:

Shilpi Chhotray, #breakfreefromplastic, shilpi@breakfreefromplastic.org, 703-400-9986

Claire Arkin, GAIA, claire@no-burn.org, 510-883-9490 ext. 111

Perry Wheeler, Greenpeace, perry.wheeler@greenpeace.org, 301-675-8766

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